Home - News - What's New - Quick Map - Site Map - Search - Contact


Xenu


   

The Xenu story is often used by Scientology critics to describe Scientology to outsiders. However, contrary to what critics say, this isn't the core belief of Scientology. While it does some good to have this secret teaching out in the open, critics mostly use it to ridicule Scientology's beliefs, to taunt Scientologists, and to reduce Scientology in the eyes of outsiders to nothing more than a nut UFO cult.


Home > Myths > Xenu

Not the Core Belief

You have probably read on web sites critical of Scientology or in the alt.religion.scientology newsgroup how the core of Scientology belief is summarized by the Xenu incident in which a despot called "Xenu" supposedly clustered several human spirits together 75,000,000 years ago and threw them in physical bodies.

This, however, is a completely misleading presentation on the part of critics.

The core belief of Scientology is that Man gradually forgot his spiritual nature after a tumultuous history of past-lives incidents, and that Scientology has the "tech" to help him regain his full spiritual awareness and abilities.

The Xenu incident, although an important one in the overall Scientology scheme, is just one of these past-lives incidents.

A very simple reasoning will show that the Xenu incident can't be the core belief of Scientology.

bullet

The Xenu incident was not known even to L. Ron Hubbard when he founded Scientology in 1953. Scientology existed as such for 14 years before the incident was discovered. When he added it on the "bridge", it did not fundamentally change anything to the basic process Scientologists followed and still follow. To this day, you could just abstract the Xenu incident and you would still have a relatively intact system referred to as "Scientology".
 

bullet

Since the Xenu incident is only revealed at a very late stage of Scientology processing, the vast majority of Scientologists don't even know about it. Yet, they call themselves "Scientologists" and refer to what they do as "Scientology".

To summarize Scientology by the Xenu incident is thus completely false. The purpose of such action is to frighten newbies away and to ridicule Scientology beliefs. It shows that, contrary to what they claim, critics are not interested in honest presentation but in propaganda and proselytism.

Secret Teachings

Critics claim that the Xenu incident shows the true science-fiction nature of Scientology, and that by revealing it they are doing a service to members to whom the incident is hidden until they are duly brainwashed.

This is another fallacious argument, and falls apart when you examine it more closely:

bullet

Contrary to what critics would want you to believe, the Science-fiction nature of Scientology is already very much present in public books and magazines. You will find there stories of past lives incidents, galactic battles, and many science fiction elements. The Xenu story as such is not particularly more or less "ludicrous" than these. Why would it require "brainwashing" to accept the Xenu story and not these other stories?
 

bullet

Secret teaching only revealed after people are considered ready to confront it is nothing new. It has been widely practiced by occult groups throughout history. Even to this day, it exist within groups like the Mormons or Free Masons. It even exists as part of the Jewish Quaballah. Why would it be brainwashing in one case and not in the other?
 

bullet

Why would the Xenu story be more ridiculous than Mo´se splitting the red sea in two, Jesus being born from a virgin, Mohammed raising to the sky on a ball of fire, or Christians eating wafers and drinking red wine while the minister mumbles about the body of Christ?

It is true that the Xenu story is used in Scientology as a "Mystery sandwich" to keep people on the bridge in the promise that their case will be ultimately resolved going through the "Wall of fire". As such, critics are doing some good in revealing the nature of this incident and in demystifying it. The way they use it, however, as part of their propaganda machine makes their actions hardly better than what they condemn within Scientology itself.

Size's post

This page originally came about because a post made by one poster (Size) in the alt.religion.scientology newsgroup. Here is that post:

Usenet post from the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology.

Source: Newbie Q: "What is Scientology?!?"

size13eee@aol.comnospam (Size13EEE)

13 May 1999 00:00:00 GMT

From: size13eee@aol.comnospam (Size13EEE)
Date: 13 May 1999 00:00:00 GMT
Message-ID: <19990513015843.07862.00001976@ng-fi1.aol.com>

Tilman Hausherr:
>Here's the belief of scientology: that you are possessed by the spirits of aliens murdered 75,000,000 years ago by "Xenu." You have to exorcise these spirits, at a very high cost per alien.

a-UFO.gif (2000 bytes)Yeti:
Since most ars critics believe that the BT exorcism business is unknown to Scientologists except for those who've become extensively involved in it, this Xemu story can hardly be what's sums up Scientology in the consensus of critics, if they really were to be honest about it. This is so as the vast majority of people who were involved with but then ditched Scientology never heard of Xemu, yet they for some time had some belief in Scientology. This is, and forever will be, the basic flaw in going around telling people that Scientology amounts to the Xemu weirdness.

A-saucer.gif (9427 bytes)Of course there's a great deal of distortion that can be achieved by going around saying Scientology is just Xemu in essence. Scientologists don't resemble suicidal "UFO cults" (recently and shockingly in the news) but can be made to carry some of their odor by playing up the Xemu business as if it were really important in the overall scheme of Scientology beliefs. It's a *distortion*, which along with such things as shore stories, "PR", acceptable truths and the like, basically amounts to what is usually called "lying".

Don't forget, should the Scios succeed in playing a dirty trick on you, that you threw your hat into the dirty trick playing arena with this kind of "Scientology is belief in Xemu" crap right along with them.

Yeti
a-Visitor.gif (530 bytes)


Science-Fiction Nature of Scientology

Science-Fiction Nature of Scientology



Random Quote :

Disclaimer :

This web site is NOT created by a Scientologist. It is created by a Scientology EX-MEMBER who is critical of Scientology. However, this ex-member is ALSO critical of the anti-Scientology movement. This does not make him a Scientologist, nor a defender of Scientology.

Quick Map :

About Myths Bigotry Anti-Cultism Criticism Third Way Links
Home
Site map
Search
What's New
Contact

Story
Q&A

 

Overview
2Questions
3Types
What

Doctrine
Xenu
Gays

Control
Kills
McPherson
Bashaw
Manson
RPF

Harrassment
Bomb
Sporgeries
Earthlink
Profit
Legal

 

Logic
Cat
Critic

 

Attacks
Clams
Hate
Christmas
Invasion
Trolling
Harassment
Violence
Award
OSA


Dissenters
Attacks
IRC
Plants
ARS

Tenets
Mind-Control
Subliminal
ACM

Discrimination
Jews
Kids
Germany
France
Trafalgar
Deprogramming

Who's Who
Cooper
Minton
Henson
Hartwig
Who

 

Experiences
Pro&Con
Dream

Questions
What Is?
Works?
Scam?

Testimonies
Sasha
Robin
Unindoctrinated

Cultism
Mirrors
Manhatan

The Tech
Key
Medical
Excalibur

Celebrities
Cruise
Celebrities

 

Scholars
Article
FBI
Papers

Moderates

Critics
Rebecca
Diane
Peter
DeadAgent1
Judy
Newbies

Ex-Members
Wolf
Jack
Claire
David
Kymus
Bernie
Interviews 

Scientologists
Enzo
Freddie
RonsAmigo
Wonderflur
Whippersnapper

Scientologists Speak
Freddie
EJ

 

ACM
Personal
Pathless